. . . cooking recipes, cookery, food, cooking vacations  
   
 
     
Cooking courses :
Cooking courses
Cooking vacations
Cooking holidays
Culinary tours
Cooking tours

PUFF PASTRY : TECHNIQUES AND HOW TO USE COOKING INFORMATION

 

Ever fancied a holiday or vacation of a lifetime?
Look no further than www.cookingholidays.co.uk

 
  TECHNIQUES FOR PUFF PASTRY  


How to get the best results when working with puff pastry

Working with puff pastry Working with puff pastry
1. For best results when rolling out puff pastry use a large, clean dry area of the work surface and lightly dust it with plain flour. 2. Place pastry dough on surface and lightly dust it and the rolling pin with flour.
Working with puff pastry Working with puff pastry
3. Roll pastry firmly, always rolling away from you, give the dough two to three rolls. 4. Then turn the dough a quarter turn.
Working with puff pastry Working with puff pastry
5. Dust again if necessary and continue rolling out, frequently turning the pastry so it is not always rolled in the same direction as this causes shrinkage. 6. When the pastry has increased in size, pick it up to turn by rolling it round the
rolling pin.
Working with puff pastry
7. Lift the pin with the pastry around it carefully and turn it to lay out and continue rolling. Again this is done to prevent the pastry from stretching as you lift it which in turn would result in shrinkage in baking. Puff pastry should be rolled out to approx. 4mm to 5mm depth.
       

Puff pastry pie lids and decoration

Add a touch of flair to pies, jalousies and other pastry dishes by being imaginative with the decoration on top.

Puff pastry pie lids and decoration Puff pastry pie lids and decoration
1.
For best results when making a pie with a pastry top or lid, choose a dish with a rim and allow the filling to get completely cold before topping with the pastry. Roll out pastry large enough to cover the dish and with some to spare.. Cut a strip, slightly wide than the dish rim, from the sides of the rolled pastry.
2.
Brush rim with water or beaten egg. Place pastry strip on rim and press firmly down, continue with further strips until all the rim is covered. Brush pastry with beaten egg or water.
Puff pastry pie lids and decoration Puff pastry pie lids and decoration
3.
Roll pastry up on the rolling pin to lift (as described above) and gently unroll it over the pie dish. Press pastry edges firmly all round.
4.
Using a sharp knife trim off excess pastry by cutting downwards against the edge of the dish. Retain the trimmings for decoration.
Puff pastry pie lids and decoration Puff pastry pie lids and decoration
5.
Knock up edges to form a good seal by holding a sharp knife horizontally against the cut edge and gently tapping the pastry edge all the way round.
6.
Make a fluted edge by pressing the thumb of your left hand firmly down on the top of the pastry on the opposite side of the dish from you, whilst drawing the back of a knife inwards, against your thumb as shown.
Puff pastry pie lids and decoration Puff pastry pie lids and decoration
7.
Continue until all the edge is fluted.
8.
Make a small hole in the centre of the lid to allow the steam to escape.
Puff pastry pie lids and decoration Puff pastry pie lids and decoration
9.
Re-roll trimmings and cut out several strips of pastry.
10.
Holding the knife at an angle, cut the strips diagonally to give diamond shapes.
Puff pastry pie lids and decoration Puff pastry pie lids and decoration
11. With the point of the knife mark veins on the pastry 'leaves'. 12. To make a 'stalk' cut further slightly narrower strips and roll them beneath your opened hands to form long cylinders.
Puff pastry pie lids and decoration Puff pastry pie lids and decoration
13. Finally, make 'berries' by gently pinching off a small piece of pastry. 14. Then roll it around the palm of your hand with the fingers of the other hand to form small balls/berries.
Puff pastry pie lids and decoration Puff pastry pie lids and decoration
15. Brush the pie top with beaten egg. 16. Lay the leaves, stalks and berries on in your chosen pattern and press gently onto lid.
Puff pastry pie lids and decoration  
17. Brush again before baking.

Using puff pastry for en-croute recipes


En Croute describes the wrapping of a filling such as steak, salmon, chicken etc in puff pastry and sealing it well to make for a moistly cooked filling encased in crisp, golden pastry.

Working with puff pastry Working with puff pastry
1. Roll out the puff pastry as described in the pages 'Rolling out Puff Pastry', and cut into the desired size as stated in the recipe. 2. Lay the filling on one half of the pastry - leaving a good border all round.
Working with puff pastry Working with puff pastry
3. Brush the pastry edges lightly with beaten egg - note -do not use too much egg as this will make it difficult to seal. 4. Bring up the uncovered half of the pastry and fold it over the filling.
Working with puff pastry Working with puff pastry
5. Press edges firmly together. 6. With a sharp knife trim off the edges to allow for a good rise.
Working with puff pastry Working with puff pastry
7. Then knock up the edges by holding the knife horizontally and taping it gently against the cut edges. This again helps to both seal the pastry and gives a good, risen edge. 8. Flute the cut edges of the en croute as described in the Puff Pie tops and decorating section (see above).
Working with puff pastry    
9. Make a couple of slashes or slits in the top pastry to allow the steam to escape and brush the top with beaten egg before baking.    

This article comes from Jus-Rol which offers an exciting and convenient range of ready-made pastry products.

The Jus-Rol story dates back to the days when convenience foods were a rarity and luxury food items were almost non-existent. It started in the 1930s, in Coldstream, Northumberland when a family man named Tom Forsyth opened his own bakery business. Little did he know then, that after surviving the war and the great depression, that his business would lead him to become the founder of the UK’s pioneering pastry company, Jus-Rol.

In the early 1950s Tom began selling puff pastry to his bakery customers and ‘Just-Roll’ was soon in regular demand. The locals loved his puff pastry and it was within no time at all that his pastry rose not only to be popular for its great taste and quality but above all, convenience. Tom soon realised that there was an opportunity to produce the product for a wider audience and so he struck while the iron was hot and began trading nationally in 1954.

The name ‘Just-Roll’ originated from the ladies that worked in the bakery, who were encouraged to take home cuttings from the pastry products prior to cooking. When asked what they did with it they replied “we just-roll it out and . . .”

The name stuck, but when registering the company, “Just Roll” was considered too descriptive and so was shortened to “Jus-Rol”. The rest as they say is history . . . but if you would like to find out more visit www.jusrol.co.uk

Published 25 November 2008