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Recipe for family meals :

Basic Italian Bread
 

Deborah Mele in FlorenceThis recipe for Basic Italian Bread comes from Deborah Mele's web site Italian Food Forever.

"My love affair with Italian cooking began almost 30 years ago when I married into a large Italian family, overflowing with talented cooks. Throughout the early years of my marriage, I had the opportunity to learn the basics of Italian cuisine, and to perfect traditional family recipes."

This is a must visit web site - if you would like to learn more then <click here>

"This is my method of making good, crusty Italian bread. Once you know how, you can do lots of things with this dough. I start with a biga or starter the day before, and leave it sit in the fridge overnight, and complete the bread the next day. I don't knead my bread as much as the traditional recipes call for, but I get great results. Even if you've never made bread before, you'll find this recipe easy".

Ingredients for Italian Bread

Biga:
1/2 Teaspoon Active Dry Yeast
1 Cup Lukewarm water
2 Cups Unbleached, All-purpose Flour

Bread:
2 Cups Warm Water (about 90 degrees F.)
1 Pkg. Active Dry Yeast
5 - 6 Cups All-purpose, Unbleached Flour
2 Teaspoons Salt

How to make Italian Bread

Biga:

  • Mix the yeast and water together, and then slowly start adding the flour, mixing well.
  • Cover with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for up to 6 hours.
  • Refrigerate overnight.

Bread:

  • Place the water in a large bowl, sprinkle the yeast overtop and mix well. Let sit 10 minutes until bubbly. Add the biga, flour, and salt and stir with a wooden spoon (or mix with your hands) until everything is mixed. The dough will be fairly wet and sticky at this point. Cover and let stand in a warm spot for about 1 to 1 1/2 hours until doubled in volume.
  • Punch down the dough, folding it over on itself two or three times, cover and let rise once more until doubled, about 1 hour. If you choose, you could refrigerate your dough at this time and leave it overnight to prepare the next day.
  • Turn out your dough onto a floured baking sheet, and without overworking it too much shape into one large or two smaller round or oval shaped loaves, using as much extra flour as needed to keep it from sticking. Slash across the tops of the loaves with a serrated knife or razor just prior to baking.
  • Preheat the oven to 350ºF. and place a casserole dish with boiling water on the lower oven rack. Bake your bread 30 minutes, turn the baking sheet around, and reduce the heat to 300º and bake for another 30 - 45 minutes. At this point your bread should be golden brown and should sound hollow when you tap the bottom. Allow the bread to cool to room temperature and serve.

Baking Tip for Italian Bread:

When making Italian bread ou could also use a baguette pan to make long thin loaves, or spread your dough across a well-oiled cookie sheet to make focaccia.

Variations of Italian Bread:

  • Italian Rosemary Bread:

    Add 4 Tbs. finely chopped rosemary to the flour. Brush the loaves with water and sprinkle with coarse sea salt just prior to baking.
  • Italian Olive Bread:

    Add 12 oz. flavorful pitted olives, coarsely chopped to the flour mixture.

Makes 2 Loaves

Deborah Mele
Italian Food Forever


Chi Mangia Bene, Mangia Italiano
(Those Who Eat Well, Eat Italian)

© Deborah Mele, Italian Food Forever

 
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