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Recipe for family meals :

Oatmeal Carrot Cookies
 

This recipe is from the SodaMail Recipes in Time! newsletter which is written by Chele who also has her own website, Chele's Treasures <click here>

Chele is a single mother of three young boys who manages to find the time to run her own desktop publishing and personalisation service from her home and also writes the popular SodaMail newsletter Recipes in Time! three days a week.

The newsletter is really interesting as not only do you get the recipe but you also learn about the food itself as in this sample recipe. This is one of the internet's better newsletters and if you are interested in your food you should subscribe. To subscribe to Recipes in Time! <click here>

A Little carrot History

The carrot (daucus carota) gets its name from the French word carotte, which in turn comes from the Latin carota. It has been known since ancient times and is believed to have originated in Afghanistan and adjacent areas.

Our common carrot is called the Mediterranean type, because it has long been known in Mediterranean countries and was probably developed there from kinds carried from Asia Minor. In the Far East is still another form, the Japanese carrot, that is commonly three feet long or more.

The carrot was certainly cultivated in the Mediterranean area before the Christian Era, but it was not important as a food until much later. By the Thirteenth century carrots were being grown in Germany and France. At that time the plant was known also in China, where it was supposed to have come from Persia. In England, around 1600, carrots were common enough to be grown as a farm crop as well as in small garden plots.

European voyagers carried the carrot to America soon after discovery of the New World. It was grown by the struggling colonists at Jamestown, Virginia, in 1609. Twenty years later the Pilgrims, or those who followed them closely, were growing it in Massachusetts.

Ingredients

1 3/4 cups quick-cook, rolled oats
1 cup carrots, shredded
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup molasses
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup nonfat, dry milk powder
1/4 cup solid shortening
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 egg

Method
  • Combine the flours, milk powder, baking powder, baking soda, salt, nutmeg, and cinnamon.
  • In another bowl, cream together the shortening, sugar, and molasses.
  • Add the egg and then the dry ingredients.
  • Stir until well blended.
  • Add the carrots, vanilla, and oats, and mix well.
  • Drop by teaspoonfuls onto an ungreased cookie sheet.
  • Bake in a preheated 375° oven for 10 to 12 minutes or until lightly browned.
  • Cool on wire rack.

Interesting Carrot Facts

In forays against the Iroquois in upper New York State in 1779 Gen. John Sullivan's forces destroyed stores of carrots as well as parsnips.

It is told that children of the Flathead tribe in Oregon liked carrots so well that they could not resist stealing them from the fields, although they resisted stealing other things.

 
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