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Chaat

RECIPE

This recipe for Chaat comes from India and was commissioned to compliment the earlier published article entitled Indian Cooking . . . how did it become so popular?

Chaat is one of the most famous street foods in India. People love their golgappa wala and always have their favourite place for chaat.

Although there are so many recipes and versions of chaat in India, the most famous is dahi chaat. You can make it at home and store for later.

Papdi tastes really nice and is a great starter or appetizer. Mixing it with potatoes, covering them with dahi and sweet & sour chutney adds a tangy taste to it. It is not only a street food but it is a necessary cuisine for occasions like weddings and parties.

Indians just love this recipe and with Indian migrants all over the world, the recipe is making its place globally and for some reason chaat is more popular among women than men in India

Sweet chutney is a key ingredient of many Indian chaat recipes such as bhel puri, sev puri or even for samosa and pakoras. It can add taste to these street food or fast food. Its main ingredients are tamarind, jaggery, dates and cumin powder.

Ingredients for Chaat

Natural Yoghurt
Potatoes
Chickpeas
Onion to garnish
Fresh coriander to garnish
Sev to garnish

Ingredients for Papdi:
1 cup maida (refined wheat flour) and
Nigella seeds (kalonji)
1 tbsp oil or ghee
Salt to taste
Water
Oil for deep frying

Ingredients for Green Chutney:
Fresh coriander
Mint leaves
Salt
Sugar
Lemon juice
Green chillies

Ingredients for Sweet Chutney:
Tamarind
Dates
Jaggery
Salt
Chilli powder
Aniseed (sauf)
Cumin seed powder

How to make Chaat

  • In a big bowl mix the maida, salt, nigella seeds and 1 tablespoon of oil or ghee. Slowly add the water and knead into a soft dough, cover and leave aside for 30 minutes. After 30 minute knead again.
  • Take the dough bit by bit and roll into small round shapes. Make dents on these using a folk and deep fry in hot oil until golden brown on both sides. Remove and drain on a tissue. Allow them to cool and store in an airtight container.
  • Prepare the green chutney by mixing together the fresh coriander, mint leaves, salt, lemon juice, sugar and green chillies. Grind them all together.
  • Prepare the sweet chutney by soaking the tamarind in warm water for a few minutes in a saucepan. Add the dates and bring to the boil till you can mix it together. Once cool mash with hands, removing any seeds and then grind it to a paste. Strain this paste into a heavy bottomed pan, heat, add the jaggery and let it melt into the paste. Boil until it thickens and then add the salt, chilli powder, aniseed and cumin seed powder. Take off the flame, allow to cool, and store in the fridge for later.
  • Cut potatoes into small cubes and boil with chickpeas. Allow to cool.
  • Take a big dish, dip 7 - 8 papdi pieces in dahi (natural yoghurt) and place on the dish. Add some boiled potatoes and chickpeas, layer with the green and sweet chutney.
  • Garnish with chopped onion, fresh coriander and serve.

This is a perfect recipe for birthday parties. In India, many housewives make it during Holi festival.

Holi Fetsival is a spring festival also known as festival of colours, and sometimes festival of love. It is an ancient Hindu religious festival which has become popular with non-Hindus in many parts of South Asia, as well as people of other communities. It is primarily observed in India, Nepal, and other regions of the world with significant populations of majority Hindus or people of Indian origin. The festival has, in recent times, spread in parts of Europe and North America as a spring celebration of love, frolic and colours.

"Just a comment about the quantity of ingredients in this series of recipes, I would say that most people add in different amounts according to how they like it. Recipes are either normally passed on or people learn by experimenting with different amounts of spices until they get the taste they like, for example, I know I put different amounts of thngs into curries than my family and friends do, everyone does tend to work out how much they like."

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Harpreet Virdee

 

 

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