Change energy supplier
  . . . cooking recipes, cookery, food, cooking vacations  
   
 
       
Cooking courses :
Cooking courses
Cooking vacations
Cooking holidays
Culinary tours
Cooking tours

Reheating food

FOOD TIPS BY TALLYRAND

We all cook too much food at some stage, we all have left overs sitting in the fridge. Whether you are a frugal cook, a parent or like me you just hate to see waste, most foods can be served a second time. Indeed some foods are best cooked ahead and reheated, like stews, curries, etc.

The very first thing that has to be considered when reheating foods is health and hygiene. Reheated foods pose a particular problem in this area, as any bacteria in the foods can multiply to very dangerous levels if not handled properly. So lets look at reheating foods from a food hygiene point of view first and ensure we prevent any possibility of food poisoning.

Most food poisoning bacteria die at or around 65°C.

Reheating foods on the stove

If using the stove to reheat ‘liquid foods’ like stews, soups, sauce, etc the chances are it will have congealed and solidified in the fridge.

  • Place into a large saucepan so that it is only half full, this allows for a greater base surface area and prevents burning, and also allows room for the air and heat to circulate.

  • Start reheating on a low temperature and as it starts to turn back into a liquid gradually increase the heat.

  • Stir frequently as it comes to a simmer.

  • Once it is simmering, cover and simmer for at least three minutes.

Ever fancied a cooking holiday? Ever fancied learning
to make bread - www.cookingholidays.co.uk

Reheating foods in the oven

Reheating foods in the oven will take longer than most other methods as there is no direct heat.

  • Layer foods as minimally as possible so as to allow the foods to reheat as quickly as they can.

  • Place into covered containers or trays to prevent burning, and allow steam to permeate through the foods.

  • If it is large meats like a chunk of left over roast, place into a covered container with a liquid (stock is best) and allow it to steam.

  • For sliced meats, place them in a covered container with a sauce, gravy or stock:

    • for pork use apple juice as this will permeate into the pork and give it a nice flavour
    • for lamb use mint sauce

Reheating foods hygienically

  • Only ever reheat foods once, so only reheat enough food as required, leave the rest in the fridge for later.

  • Reheat food thoroughly so that it reaches a core temperature of 70°C minimum, a temperature probe is of course best but if you do not have one:

    • this means it is so hot it needs blowing on before eating
    • boiling point is 100°C so if liquid foods have boiled they have been brought up to and over the required 70°C.

  • Ensure the food is thoroughly reheated, the above temperature must go all the way through the foods.

  • If reheating liquid foods like soups, stews, etc bring slowly to the boil while stirring frequently. Once it does boils allow it to simmer for 3 minutes while stirring to ensure the heat goes all the way through.

  • Serve the food as hot as possible.

Reheating foods in a microwave

A microwave is often the quickest and easiest way of reheating most foods for most households, so if you do use it:

  • Place food into an oversized container to allow room for the heat to circulate.

  • Cover the container to prevent mini explosions causing a mess or injuries.

  • Reheat in small increments, maybe a minute at a time, allow it to sit for 10 seconds before uncovering, stirring and giving it another minute.

  • Stir often to evenly distribute the heat.

  • The foods will still be actively heating after the microwave turns off, so allow to sit before uncovering, to prevent any mini explosions and causing injury.

  • Microwaves work best on wet foods. If the foods are dry foods, foods with little sauce, etc (fried rice, macaroni cheese, etc) add a little liquid (water or stock) before covering and reheating.

  • If it is large meats like a chunk of left over roast, place into a covered container with a liquid (stock is best) and allow it to steam.

  • For sliced meats, place them in a covered container with a sauce, gravy or stock
    • for pork use apple juice this will permeate into the pork and give it a nice flavour
    • for lamb use mint sauce.

RELATED RECIPE

  • No specific recipe

Tallyrand
Food and Cooking Tips
from professional
Chef Tallyrand

 

Born and raised in Plymouth, Tallyrand started his initial training as a chef at Plymouth College of Further Education. It was here that he was to learn his love, his passion for food and the culinary arts. From here he headed to Germany to complete his apprenticeship as Commis de Gardemanger.

Germany gave him his first taste of cooking for the rich and famous, as half way through his first year, along with the Sous Chef and a Chef de Partie, he was whisked off to Cologne to help prepare meals for a political conference, where amongst other dignitaries they cooked for Mr Brehznev, the then powerful Russian leader. This was to prove to be just one of the many celebrities he was to cook for or get to know over the years . . .

Email Hub-UK : info@hub-uk.com